GF White Bread (for bread machines)

GF White Bread (for bread machines)

GF bread is ridiculously expensive and generally doesn’t taste all that great. I’ve incorporated elements from various recipes for a standard white bread that is quickly and easily made in a bread machine. Believe me when I say that it’s super convenient and tastes awesome. Even my non-gf family members like it, which means a loaf is often half-gone soon after it finishes baking. The trick is with the unflavored gelatin, which gives it a lighter, springier texture than you find in most gf breads.

 

Ingredients

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups milk, at room temperature
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup honey
3 eggs
1/3 cup cornstarch
1/2 cup potato starch
1/2 cup tapioca flour
2 cups white rice flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 tablespoon xanthan gum
1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin
1 tablespoon active dry yeast

 

Directions

In a medium bowl, add apple cider vinegar to the milk, then let sit a few minutes. Mix in the oil, honey, and eggs.

In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients (except the yeast) and mix thoroughly.

Place ingredients in the pan of the bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer, usually liquid ingredients first, then dry, and finally the yeast on top.

Select the sweet dough cycle (not GF cycle). Select medium crust. Five minutes into the cycle, or when the machine beeps, check the consistency of the dough. Add additional rice flour or liquid if necessary.

When bread is finished, let cool for 10 to 15 minutes before removing from pan. I usually lift the lid of the machine for a few minutes, then remove the pan (with bread) from the machine and lay it on its side while it cools. Also, remove the little mixer thing from the bottom of the loaf before slicing. I find that metal in my bread isn’t very tasty.

Yields 1 (2-pound) loaf
 
Notes: If, like me, you rarely have potato starch on hand, use an equal amount of tapioca starch or cornstarch. You can also use brown rice flour in place of the white rice flour, depending on your preference or availability of ingredients.